Visiting Israeli Scholar Program

ISMI's central mission is to further awareness and understanding of modern Israel on the Emory University Campus; ISMI's Visiting Israeli Scholar Program brings top-flight Israeli scholars to Atlanta to enrich the fabric of our University and provide a unique academic perspective in a variety of fields of study. ISMI's Visiting Israeli Scholars participate regularly in programs sponsored by other organizations in Atlanta and nationally.

Funds for Visiting Israeli Scholars are raised externally from Emory alumni, their parents, foundations, and other donors, and donated as gifts to Emory College. Visiting Israeli Scholars have been post-doctoral appointments and regular visiting faculty appointments confirmed by Emory College. Visiting scholar appointments are dependent upon funds raised annually. By November of an academic year, if funds are available, applications are sought and appointments made. Because of uncertainty in annual funding there is no official application process. Visiting Israeli scholars hold a temporary appointment, which concludes upon completion of their course offerings.

The most recent Visiting Israeli Scholar is Amb. Reda Mansour, PhD

13 Scholars -- 37 Courses -- 645 Students

The following is a full list of courses taught by Visiting Israeli Scholars (along with syllabi, when possible):

Amb. Reda Mansour, PhD

Fall 2017

Israel: Religion, Society, Culture, and Identity

Syllabus

This course explores the issues of religion, society, culture and identity in Israel. Israel is an emergent society composed of Jewish immigrants that arrived from more than 70 different countries. It is also a country that defines itself as "Jewish and Democratic" with a large minority containing 20% Arab citizens and other ethnic-religious groups. This course will present these different groups, discussing the interactions between them and their communities of origin. It will likewise explore the changes in the culture and identity of these groups. This course will present the "The Four Tribes" dynamics of Israeli society. This model, outlined by President Reuven Rivlin in 2015 posited that “secular” Jewish-Israelis, once the dominant group in the country, and especially amongst the elite, would no longer be a clear majority. Israel is rapidly moving towards being a minority-dominated society, comprised of four tribes: Ultra-Orthodox Jews, Religious Jews, Secular Jews, and Arabs.

Israeli Diplomacy: History, and Politics

Syllabus

This course explores Israeli diplomacy since the state’s establishment in 1948 until now. We will explore major changes in Israeli diplomacy through its many forms: Traditional Diplomacy, Public Diplomacy, Development Diplomacy, Cultural & Economic Diplomacy, Multilateral Diplomacy and Crisis Diplomacy. The course also looks at the role of Israeli diplomacy in times of war and conflict as well as in times of peace and negotiation. It discusses the effects of modern diplomatic tools such as technology, social networks and state branding on Israeli diplomacy. Increasingly open and interdependent global political and economic environments, the rise of non-state actors and interest groups internationally, along with rapid advances in information technology, have arguably changed the practice of Israeli diplomacy in the 21st century. In the Middle East, the traditional instruments of government state craft such as "Hard Power” proveless sure in a diffuse and multi-polar geopolitical setting. This course will examine what roles “soft power” and “smart power” play in Israeli foreign policy.

Dr. Ziv Rubinovitz

Spring 2015

History of Israeli Foreign Policy 

Syllabus

The course analyzes Israel's foreign relations, and examines the tension between Israel's geographic location in the Middle East and its Western orientation. It looks at how Israel’s foreign relations emerged from Israel’s Jewish origins, the Palestine Mandate, Israel's relations with the great powers, and the superpowers as well as its regional quest for recognition. 

Spring 2015

Zionist and Israeli Political Leadership: Idealism, Realism and Pragmatism 

Syllabus

The course discusses the political leadership of the State of Israel as an introduction into Israel's political system. The course begins with the pre-state (Yishuv) era and then analyzes the leadership since 1948. The analysis highlights the ideational, realist and pragmatic aspects of Israel's leadership throughout its existence. It discusses the prime ministers and other leading figures, as well as their personal impact and leadership in Israel's history, both in the foreign affairs and security arenas as well as the the domestic arena. It deals with the major events in Israel's history – the establishment of the state, war and peace, domestic political affairs, government-military relations, and dealing with economic and social developments.

DR. YARON AYALON

Spring 2013

Sephardic Jews in the Diaspora and Israel 

Syllabus

Aiming to survey the history of Sephardic Jews, this course will begin with a brief discussion of the formative Middle Ages, which in many ways defined and shaped Jewish practices and customs for centuries to come. We will move on to the Expulsion of the Jews from Spain, and then the Ottoman period and the transformation of the eastern Mediterranean Jewish world into a Sephardi-dominated one, in language and practices. Then we will discuss the changes Sephardi-Mizrahi communities experienced with the emergence of Zionism and the immigration to the State of Israel, where the Sephardim were a majority until the 1990s. We will devote the last third of the semester to the experiences of Sephardi-Mizrahi Jews in Israel.

Fall 2012

Contemporary Israeli Society and Politics 

Syllabus

The State of Israel was founded in 1948. For Jews, it was the fulfillment of a 2000-years-long dream to return to their ancestral homeland of Erets Yisrael. For others, notably the Arab inhabitants known as the Palestinians (named after the land, Palestine), the establishment of a Jewish state was a tragedy. This course, however, will deal very briefly with the dispute between the two parties known as the Arab-Israeli Conflict. Although the conflict has undoubtedly shaped Israeli society and its political system, this course will mostly have an inward focus on Israel itself: its political system, international relations, how it functions as a society of immigrants, relationships between secular and religious Jews and between Jews of various ethnic backgrounds, and the role the military plays in Israeli society. We will also look at Israeli culture through music, television, and film.

Previous knowledge about the history of Judaism, Israel, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, or the Middle East is helpful, but not required. Historical and other background will be provided in class, as well as in the readings for most weeks.

Spring 2012

Israeli Society and Politics 
Syllabus
The State of Israel was founded in 1948. For Jews, it was the fulfillment of a 2000-year long dream to return to their ancestral homeland of Eretz Yisrael. For others, notably the Arab inhabitants known as the Palestinians (named after their land, Palestine), the establishment of a Jewish state was a tragedy. This course, however, will deal very briefly with the dispute between the two parties, also known as the Arab-Israeli Conflict. Although the conflict has undoubtedly shaped Israeli society and its political system, this course will mostly have an inward focus on Israel itself: its political system, international relations, how it functions as a society of immigrants, relationships between secular and religious Jews and between Jews of various ethnic backgrounds, and the role the military plays in Israeli society. We will also look at Israeli culture through music and film.
 
Previous knowledge about the history of Judaism, Israel, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, or the Middle East is helpful, but not required. Historical and other background will be provided in class, as well as in the readings for most weeks.

Freshman Seminar: Migration in the Muslim World
Syllabus

 This freshman seminar has a number of goals: to make you better writers; to teach you a set of academic skills necessary for your success in college, from performing independent research through documenting sources properly to reading and analyzing evidence; to provide you with numerous tips that would give you the edge over others while at Emory and beyond; and also to teach you a thing or two about Islam, migratory movements, and the problem of immigration the world faces today. Accordingly, we will look at population movements throughout Islamic history. We will explore involuntary and voluntary forms of migration, assimilation into new societies, social mobility, and how newcomers and receiving societies deal with cultural differences. Although this is a history seminar, much of our discourse will venture into other disciplines, especially sociology and psychology. No previous knowledge or preparation is required to take this class. I will explain everything during our weekly meetings, but occasionally you may find a need to do some research on your own to find answers.


DR. YARON AYALON 
Fall 2011

The Jews of Arab Lands
Syllabus

Aiming to survey the history of Middle Eastern Jews in the modern period, this course will begin with a brief discussion of the formative middle ages, which in many ways defined and shaped Jewish practices and customs for centuries to come. We will move on to the Ottoman period and the transformation of the eastern Mediterranean Jewish world into a Sephardi-dominated one, in language and practices. Then we will discuss the changes Jewish communities in Arab countries experienced with the emergence of Zionism and the immigration to the State of Israel. We will devote the last third of the semester to the experiences of mizrahi Jews (those from Arab lands) in Israel. Topics covered will include the absorption of Middle Eastern Jews in Israel; the socioeconomic status of Jews from Arab lands in Israel and how it changed over the years; their involvement in Israeli politics and how it affected the immigrants as well as the Israeli political game; and the culture Jews from Arab lands brought with them, such as music and popular customs, and how the impact these have had upon Israeli society.

Previous knowledge about Jewish history, the Middle East, or Islam is helpful, but not required. Sufficient background will be given on the first week, and throughout the course, in the weekly readings and during lecture.

Modern Turkey
Syllabus

The foundation of the modern republic of Turkey in 1923 was accompanied by sweeping religious, political, social, and linguistic reforms. Initiated by the founder of the Republic Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, these changes were intended to create a new, modern society by breaking with past traditions. Atatürk's vision of a new Turkey was realized to a great extent. But it is impossible to understand the social and political predicaments Turkey faces today - the rise of political Islam, the aspirations to join the European Union, the Kurdish problem, Turkey's place among Middle Eastern nations, its strategic relationship with the US and Israel - without exploring Turkey's Ottoman heritage. This class consists of two parts. The first tells the story of the Ottoman Empire, Modern Turkey's predecessor, with emphasis on its last century and the factors that brought about its demise, as well as the history of Modern Turkey to this day. The second part will discuss contemporary issues in Turkish politics, society, and international relations. Previous knowledge about the history of Modern Turkey, the Ottoman Empire or the Middle East is helpful, but not required. Historical background will be provided in lectures, as well as in the readings for most weeks.


DR. DAVID TAL
Spring 2009

The History of Israeli Foreign Policy
Syllabus

This course will concentrate on Israel's diplomatic history. It will discuss Israel international orientation in the 1950s', the role of the diplomats in the pursuit of security alliance with a great power, first with France and later with the United States; the search for peace and the diplomats role in the preparation to war, before and after the 1956, 1967
and 1973 wars; and the role of diplomacy throughout the Israeli- Palestinian rapprochement and conflict.

The Great Powers in the Middle East, 1914- Present
Sorry, no syllabus is availalbe for this course

This course will deal with the creation of the Middle East in its present form, with the entry of the Great Powers to the region after the First World War. It will discuss the rise of the British influence in the region and its decline in the aftermath of the second world war, the rise of Arab nationalism, as a counter force and the growing role and influence of the United States in the area, the turning of the Middle East into a great powers' Cold War battle field, and the role of the decolonization movement in the changing face of the Middle East.


DR. DORON SHULTZINER
Lincoln College, Oxford University
Spring 2009

Contemporary Issues in Israeli Politics
Syllabus

This colloquium looks at developments in Israeli politics, society and constitutional arrangements from the 1990s until present day. The main topics that will be covered in the course are the changing agenda and nature of the Israeli politics, the role of the Israeli Supreme Court in shaping political realities, new dimensions of political extremism, gender
politics, and interest groups. A relevant historic review about each topic will precede each topic and will provide understanding of Israeli politics, society and law along specific topics. No previous knowledge of Israel is required.


DR. DAVID TAL
Fall 2008

The Making of the U.S.-Israeli Relationship
Syllabus

The course will deal with the buildup and development of the Israeli-American relationship from the 1940s to the present. The course will describe the historical roots of the American support to the Zionist idea in the 19th century, the transfer of the Jewish diplomatic center from Britain to the US, the ideological roots of the US support of Israel and its extent, beyond the security dimension and the mutuality of those relationship, that is, the Israeli input in the creation of the
Israeli-American special relations.

Issues in Israeli National Security
Syllabus

National security is a prime issue in Israel, and it was so since its existence. Being established in war, leaving in hostile environment, Israel had to deal with issues pertaining to its national security with the highest priority. The course will focus on several issues pertaining to Israels national security, bringing together military, diplomatic and social issues. We'll study the ideas that provided the basis for the development of Israels national security policy, build up of the IDF and the development of military strategy that were aimed to accomplish the goals of Israel's national security policy; the role of diplomacy in the shaping and conduct of Israel's national security policy; the pursuit of peace and the conduct of wars; military-civic relations in Israel; Israel and the non-conventional threats, nuclear and low-intensity conflicts.


DR. DORON SHULTZINER
Lincoln College, Oxford University
Fall 2008

History of Israeli Politics: Institutions & Society
Syllabus

This course explores the Israeli political system, its institutional characteristics and components, and its main political dilemmas. The course aims to provide knowledge about Israeli political history and society. Topics included will be the origins and the historical developments of the political system, electoral histories, and government formation. Attention is given to the dynamics between institutional arrangements and social cleavages in Israel and their interrelated effects. The course also discusses some of the main socio-political issues and tensions resulting from the dual definition of Israel as a Jewish and democratic state, religion and politics, and the effects of armed conflicts on politics and society. The course requires no previous knowledge about Israel.


DR. PAUL RIVLIN
Tel Aviv University
Spring 2008

The Israeli Economy
Syllabus

This course traces the history of the pre-independence and modern economy, examining the role of population growth and immigration, problems of inflation and stabilization, the balance of payments and sectoral developments. It analyzes the role of the Histadrut, the defense budget, the economics of the peace process of the 1990s, and Israel's integration into the world economy. The effects of the second Intifada and the current rapid growth of the economy are also examined.

The International Oil Market and the Political Economy of the Middle East
Syllabus

This course examines the connections between the world's reliance on oil and the political economy of the Middle East. The first part of the course examines world energy markets and their development, with emphasis on the USA. It then places oil consumption into the wider energy context. The rise of China and India as energy consumers is also examined and some environmental issues are analyzed. The second part of the course looks at the Middle East as an oil supplier: what was the role of the West and how renter states have come into being. Economic and strategic conclusions are drawn.


DR. DORON SHULTZINER
Lincoln College, Oxford University
Spring 2008

Israeli Society and the Constitution in the Prism of the Law: History and Evolution
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This course explores the evolution of the constitutional arrangement in Israel. The special role of the Israeli Supreme Court in shaping norms and protecting human rights in the lack of a formal constitution is highlighted. Special attention is given to the interpretation of the concept of `human dignity' in extending the scope of protection to human rights in the 1990s. By way of examining the history and evolution of the Israeli constitutional law, the course also explores some contentious political and social issues that were discussed by the Supreme Court, such as the Jewish character of the state, minority rights, and gender. The course "Israeli Politics: Institutions and Society" is recommended but not obligatory for taking this course.


DR. DORON SHULTZINER
Lincoln College, Oxford University
Fall 2007

History of Israeli Politics: Institutions and Society
Syllabus

This course explores the Israeli political system, its institutional characteristics and components, and its main political dilemmas. The course aims to provide knowledge about Israeli political history and society. Topics included will be the origins and the development of the political system, electoral histories, and government formation. Attention is given to the dynamics between institutional arrangements and social cleavages in Israel and their interrelated effects. The course also discusses some of the main socio-political issues and tensions resulting from the dual definition of Israel as a Jewish and democratic state, religion and politics, and the effects of armed conflicts on politics and society. The course requires no previous knowledge about Israel.


DR. AMI AYALON
Tel Aviv University
Fall 2007

The Near East: 1914-Present
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This course aims to explore the historic foundations and current attributes of Middle Eastern society, politics and culture. We will examine the historic roots from the late  Ottoman period to World War II, then move on to analyze major themes in the region's contemporary realities. Topics will include social and demographic trends, state-formation, nationalism, liberalism and democracy, Islamic radicalism and revolt, domestic and inter-Arab relations, the emergence of modern Israel, Turkey, and Iran, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and relations between the states of the region and the rest of the world.

Land of Israel 1882-1948: Sources, Narratives, Perspectives
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This Junior/Senior seminar will examine the pre-1948 history of the country which for Jews is ancestral Eretz Israel and the Arabs call Palestine. We will review the two parties' divergent outlooks at the point of departure, their views of each other, the dialogue/antagonism between them, and political implications throughout this turbulent period. Students will use secondary as well as primary sources, including (to the extent possible) sources in Arabic and Hebrew. We will conclude by assessing the impact of these disparities on later Jewish-Palestinian relations.


DR. MICHAEL FEIGE (z"l)
Sde Boker, Israel
Spring 2007

Judaism in Israel: Religion, Politics and Ethnicity
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

Some consider Israel as "the Jewish state," demanding that the state be constructed according to the logic of the Jewish halacha; most Israelis are content to see "the State of the Jews", a place where Jews can hold their identity and strive without fear of persecution. This course will explore the meaning and various manifestations of the intersection between Jewish religion and the State of Israel. The main focus of the course would be on the main Jewish religious communities: the Haredim (Ultra-orthodox), the National Religious and Shas (the Mizrahi Haredim), and the new versions of modern Judaism that are currently developing and expanding. The Israeli case can exemplify how religions encounter the challenges of modernity and nationalism through processes of transformation and accommodation.


DR. MICHAEL FEIGE (z"l)
Sde Boker, Israel
Fall 2006

Visions and Divisions: An Introduction to Israeli Society
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

Built on the premises of Zionist ideology, Israeli state and society has to encounter to this day issues of inner and outer conflicts, multiple identity options and social divisions, some focused on the right way to define the national collective. This course will explore processes of identity formation in Israel, concentrating of the ideology, characteristics and social position of major social groups, such as the early Israeli pioneers, the second generation "Sabre", and various religious, national and ethnic groups. The effects of gender identity and of the protracted conflict on forming an Israeli sense of self shall also be discussed. The course portrays the historical development of "Israeliness" through the state years, and reaches issues concerning contemporary Israeli society.


DR. DAVID TAL
Tel Aviv University
Spring 2006

Great Powers & the Middle East, 1914-Present
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

The course deals with the creation of the Middle East in its present form, with the entry of the Great Powers to the region after the First World War. It discusses the rise of the British influence in the region and its decline in the aftermath of the Second World War, the rise of Arab nationalism, as a counter force and the rowing role and influence of the United States in the area, the turning of the Middle East into a Great Powers' Cold War battle field, and the role of the decolonization movement in the changing face of the Middle East.

History of Israeli Foreign Policy
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

The course concentrates on Israel's diplomatic history and discusses Israel's international orientation in the 1950's, the role of the diplomats in the pursuit of security alliance with a Great Power, first with France and later with the United States; the search for peace and the diplomat's role in the preparation to war, before and after the 1956, 1967, and 1973 Wars; and the role of diplomacy throughout the Israeli-Palestinian rapprochement and conflict.


DR. DAVID TAL
Tel Aviv University
Fall 2005

History of Modern Israel
Syllabus

This survey discussed thematically issues pertaining to the history of Israel from 1948: David Ben Gurion, the father of the nation; security problems and the Arab-Israeli conflict; Israel political system from Labor dominancy to the Likud Governments; the ethnic tensions (Sepharadim and Ashkenazim); the transition from socialist to free market economy; the ghosts of the Holocaust; the limits of the nation-state; Israel and its Arab citizens; Israel and the Religious and non-Religious identity; Israel and the Palestinian problem; and Israel in the aftermath of the 1967 War.

History & Politics of Nuclear Disarmament, 1945-Present
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This course dealt with the negotiations on nuclear disarmament, explained why a disarmament agreement per se was never achieved, what was achieved, after all, and why. It described the influence of international diplomacy as well as domestic politics on the progress of the negotiations, and it described the conceptual change that took place in the United States position following the launching of the Soviet Sputnik that led first to a conceptual transition from the concept of Disarmament to the concept of Arms Control, a change that eventually allowed the signing of agreements like the Partial Nuclear Test Ban, the Non Proliferation Treaty, the SALT agreement, and so on.


DR. OFRA BENGIO
Tel Aviv University
Fall 2004

History of Modern Iraq
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

For more than a quarter-century, Iraq has been the focus of world attention, particularly the United States.  This course examined the history of Iraq, beginning in the late 19th century under the Ottoman Empire, when Baghdad was considered by the Great Powers a marginal, backwater city, through its evolution into a pivotal state in the Middle East, and internationally.  It explored various social, economic, and political issues, and particularly the relationship between domestic and international developments.  Doing so helped explain how the U.S. found itself drawn into a war with Iraq twice within little more than a decade.

Minorities in the Arab World
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

The issue of minorities is one of the most serious problems facing the modern state in the Middle East.  Moreover, it is closely linked to an additional major issue:  the need for democratization and representative government.  This course analyzed the problem not only through the lens of the state, but also through the eyes of minority groups themselves, many of which predate the Arab-Muslim conquest of the 7th century.  After providing a regional overview of the subject, the course focused on the "leading" minority groups of the region - the Kurds, Copts, Berbers, and Shiites - as well as the states' respective discourses and policies towards them.


DR. REUVEN HAZAN
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Spring 2004

Introduction to Comparative Politics
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This course introduced students to the main concepts, institutions, processes and issues in the field of comparative politics. It also provided students with the major tools and methods for comparative political analysis. The course aimed at teaching students how to analyze the political institutions of different countries - largely the advanced industrial democracies, but others as well - and to assess their patterns of political behavior along with their resulting political outcomes. In doing so, it developed the students' ability to compare institutions and outcomes across political systems.

Israeli Politics and Society
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This course presented an analysis, couched within theoretical frameworks from other Western democracies, of politics and society in Israel. Emphasis was on classification, typological mappings and model-derived explanations of how the social cleavages in Israeli society function and behave in the political process, and how the political institutions influence social divisions, particularly in light of the reforms during the last decade that transformed Israeli politics. This course also exposed students to some of the contemporary socio-political issues in Israel, particularly the highly contentious problem of religion and politics.


DR. REUVEN HAZAN
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Fall 2003

Israeli Parties and Elections
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This course presented a comparative analysis of political parties and elections in Israel. The goal was to introduce students to the electoral politics of Israel while acquainting them with the basic terms, concepts and theories on political parties and elections. Emphasis focused on general, model-derived explanations of how the political parties function and behave in the Israeli electoral process, and particularly on the elaboration of the reforms that transformed the arena of Israeli politics in the 1990s and continue to reshape it today.

Parties and Elections
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This course presented a comparative analysis, couched within theoretical frameworks, of political parties, party systems and elections in Western settings. The emphasis was on general classifications, typological mappings, model-derived explanations and the differences that affect the performance of parties and party systems. The goal of this course was to acquaint students with the basic terms, concepts, theories and arguments in the sub-fields of political parties and electoral systems, and to provide the theoretical and methodological tools necessary to undertake either an in-depth case study or a comparative cross-country analysis of parties and elections.


DR. MEIR LITVAK
Tel Aviv University
Fall 2003

Modern Iran
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This undergraduate lecture course reviewed the history of modern Iran from the crisis of the monarchy in the 19th Century through the modernizing royal dictatorship in the 20th Century to a revolutionary Islamic republic. The course examined the interplay between political, socioeconomic and cultural processes that shaped these developments, particularly the interaction between religion and politics, and that between foreign powers and domestic players. It also analyzed the causes of the Islamic revolution, and Iran's quest to reconcile between modernity and tradition by formulating new Islamic policies in the domestic and foreign arenas in the twenty-year period after the revolution.

Radical Islamic Movements in the Modern Middle East
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This junior/senior colloquium reviewed the emergence and evolution of radical Islamic movements in the modern Middle East since the traumatic encounter with the West during the 19th Century to the present. It covered movements from the Taliban in Afghanistan and Ben Laden's al-Qaida, going through the Iranian revolution, the Muslim Brethren in Egypt, Hamas in Palestine, Hizbollah in Lebanon to Algeria in North Africa. The seminar examined the interaction between modern Islamic ideologies and the political conduct of these movements in such issues as the desired type of Islamic government, the compatibility between Islam and democracy, the meaning of jihad in the modern period, women's rights and socioeconomic policies.


DR. MICHAEL BAR-ZOHAR
Independent Israeli Scholar
Spring 1993

Personalities in Israeli Political History
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

The extraordinary face of Israel was shaped by a gallery of charismatic founding fathers and a second generation of brilliant and often rebellious sons. Israel might not have existed without the prophetic figure of David Ben-Gurion. Its history might have been different without the staunch Golda Meir, the conciliating Levi Eshkol, the diplomatic Abba Eban, the intrepid Moshe Dayan, the magnetic Menachem Begin, the iron-willed Shimon Peres, the dedicated Itzhak Rabin, and others. The colloquium followed these leaders in the struggles that shaped the main decisions in Israel's history.

Israeli Foreign and Defense Policies, 1948-Present
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

Haunted by the danger of destruction by their neighbors, Israel's leaders have for years subordinated their foreign policy to the needs of national defense. The main goals of Israel's defense policy have been developing a powerful deterrent and destroying the enemy's power even at the price of war. These goals dictated the foreign policy of the country obtaining weapons abroad and concluding an alliance with the U.S. Only after Egypt's Anwar Sadat declared that he wanted "no more war" could the Israeli foreign policy win its independence and launch the present peace process.


DR. BRUCE MADDY-WEITZMAN
Tel Aviv University
Spring 1991

Middle Eastern States
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

Whether it's Saddam Hussein, Fundamentalist Islam, the demographic explosion, or the gyrations of oil prices, the Middle East continues to be an arena of crisis. This course examined the political, economic, social and cultural challenges currently facing the Arab world, both individually and collectively. It analyzed the policy options facing the Arab states, searched for the link between domestic and regional issues, and placed them in the context of international developments, such as the coming economic union in Europe, and the breakdown of the Soviet empire and the rise of democratic movements in Eastern Europe.


DR. BRUCE MADDY-WEITZMAN
Tel Aviv University
Fall 1990

The Near East, 1914-Present
Sorry, no syllabus is available for this course

This course was an introductory survey of the modern Near East in the 20th Century. Topics included a brief review of Islamic and medieval Near Eastern history, and the Ottoman Empire's decline. Special emphasis was given to the origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict. In the post-World War II period, focus was directed at pan-Arabism, inter-Arab political history, the economics and politics of modernization, and the petro-dollar revolution. Extensive time was devoted to the Palestinians, modern Israel, the unfolding peace process, and U.S. foreign policy toward modern Israel, and U.S. foreign policy toward the region. The history of individual countries was undertaken, with primary focus on Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Transjordan, Lebanon, Syria, Iran and Turkey.